ROCAL - Réseau Ouest et Centre Africain pour la Conservation du Lion
ROCAL - Réseau Ouest et Centre Africain pour la Conservation du Lion ROCAL - Réseau Ouest et Centre Africain pour la Conservation du Lion
English French
Accueil Actualités/Agenda Projects Documents Liens Galerie Photo Membres et Adhesion Contact
ROCAL - Réseau Ouest et Centre Africain pour la Conservation du Lion
October 2011: Another paper on human-carnivores conflicts in West Africa


E.A. SOGBOHOSSOU, H.H. DE IONGH, B. SINSIN, G.R. DE SNOO & P.J. FUNSTON. 2011. Human–carnivore conflict around Pendjari Biosphere Reserve, northern Benin. Oryx, 45(4), 569–578
Abstract

Close proximity between humans and large predators results in high levels of conflict. We investigated the extent of, and factors leading to, this conflict through focal group and individual interviews in all villages around Pendjari Biosphere Reserve, northern Benin. Livestock losses from 2000 to 2007 (n5752) were reported to be mainly caused by spotted hyaena Crocuta crocuta (53.6%), baboon Papio anubis (24.8%), and lion Panthera leo (18.0%). These predators mainly predated sheep and goats (52.1%) and pigs (42.3%), with lions being the main predators of cattle (78.9%). Lion and hyaena diets were more diverse than that of baboons, which killed only small stock. The level of conflict increased during 2000–2007. Predation rate differs between predator species and is significantly influenced by month, rainfall of the month before the predation event, and length of the dry period in a year. The geographical position of the village, the distance of the village to the Park and the number of herbivores legally killed every hunting season also influenced predation intensity. Our findings suggest that improvement of husbandry techniques and education will reduce conflicts and contribute to improved conservation of these threatened predators.

Keywords

Benin, livestock–predator conflict, Pendjari Biosphere Reserve, predation, predator conservation, West Africa


Hans BAUER, Hans de IONGH & Etotepe SOGBOHOSSOU. 2010. Assessment and mitigation of human-lion conflict in West and Central Africa. Mammalia 74: 363–367
Abstract

The lion (Panthera leo) is most threatened in West and Central Africa; livestock encroachment and indiscriminate killing of lions are the main threats. Human-lion conflict mitigation is therefore key to persistence. Several experiments were carried out in the region to assess and mitigate human-lion conflict. In Pendjari National Park in Benin, enclosures of clay instead of the usual thorny branches reduced depredation figures by half. Around the Niger side of ‘W’ National Park, depredation was estimated at US$138 per household per year and occurred mostly while grazing; people identified improved herding as the most appropriate measure. A livestock corridor through a chain of protected areas has helped reduce conflict in Benoue National Park, Cameroon. Close monitoring and enclosure improvements reduced depredation from 9 to 0 attacks in enclosures and from 60 to 18 on the pastures of six villages around Waza National Park, Cameroon. Cases in Chad and Guinea identified yet other mitigation measures, including the use of dogs, sensitisation over rural radio and using relevant Sourats from the Koran; data on effectiveness are lacking, however. These projects illustrate a varied suite of mitigation options and demonstrate that mitigation can be effective if the method is judiciously chosen and adapted to local circumstances.

Keywords

carnivores; corridor; depredation; enclosures; livestock

back to the news page